Beekeeping News Articles

This is a list of news articles I have come across that discuss bees and beekeeping. Articles are generally listed from most recent to least recent. This list was started in 2016.

~ 2016 ~ 2017 ~

2017

2016

  • “To Help Bees, Skip Herbicides and Pesticides, Keep Lawns Naturally Diverse,” Environmental New Network
    • October 7, 2016
    • Summary: Declining populations of pollinators is a major concern to ecologists because bees, butterflies and other insects play a critical role in supporting healthy ecosystems. Now a new study from urban ecologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggests that when urban and suburban lawns are left untreated with herbicides, they provide a diversity of “spontaneous” flowers such as dandelions and clover that offer nectar and pollen to bees and other pollinators. Private lawns make up a significant part of urban lands in the United States, an estimated 50 percent of city and suburbs, say Susannah Lerman and co-author Joan Milam, an adjunct research fellow in environmental conservation. They write, “Practices that support nesting and foraging opportunities for bees could have important implications for bee conservation in suburban areas.” Lerman, an adjunct UMass Amherst faculty member who is also with the U.S. Forest Service, says, “We are still surprised at how many bees we found on these untreated lawns.”
    • http://www.enn.com/ecosystems/article/50044
  • “Bees Take Longer to Learn Floral Odors Polluted by Vehicle Fumes,” Science News
    •  October 7, 2016
    • Summary: In lab tests bees normally caught on quickly that a puff of floral scent meant a researcher would soon offer them a taste of sugar, Ryan James Leonard of the University of Sydney said September 30 at the bees in honeycombInternational Congress of Entomology. After two sequences of puff-then-sugar, just a whiff of fragrance typically made the bees stick out their tongues. But when that floral scent was mixed with vehicle exhaust, it took the bees several more run-throughs to respond to the puff signal.
    • https://www.sciencenews.org/article/bees-take-longer-learn-floral-odors-polluted-vehicle-fumes?tgt=nr
  • “Bees Added To Endangered Species List For The First Time,” The Huffington Post
    • 09/30/2016 08:46 pm ET | Updated Oct 03, 2016
    • Summary: Trouble in paradise for seven species of pollinators native to Hawaii.
    • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/bees-endangered-species_us_57eeeb0be4b024a52d2f2791
  • Bees Added to U.S. Endangered Species List for 1st Time,” PBS
  • The Monarch Butterfly is in Danger of Extinction – Here’s What You Can Do to Help,” One Green Planet
    •  October 3, 2016
    • Summary: Humans have played a large role in the destruction of monarch butterflies, and now they need our help to survive. Advocacy groups and the government are working hard to save their habitats, but there are a few simple things we can do as well, and it all begins in our backyard – literally! One of them is plant milkweed. There are several other ways to help too.
    • http://www.onegreenplanet.org/environment/monarch-butterflies-is-in-danger-what-we-can-do-to-help/
  • “Devastating Trade: Neurotoxin Spray Killed Harmful Mosquitoes But Exterminated Beneficial Bees,” Nature World News
    • September 6, 2016
    • Summary:  In an effort to prevent further transmission of Zika virus, local officials in South Carolina decided to aerially spray a small area of the town Summerville with a powerful neurotoxins that could kill adult Zika-carrying mosquitoes. However, the drastic move of the local officials did not only kill off adult Aedes aeqypti mosquitoes but also exterminated millions of bees. The chemical used during the aerial spray is commonly known as Naled. Naled has been registered for use in the U.S. since 1959. It is a neurotoxin specifically used to target adult mosquitoes. However, Naled is also considered to be toxic to other insects, birds and fish. Furthermore, Naled is considered to cause skin and eye irritation in humans and is dangerous when ingested or inhaled.
    • http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/28195/20160906/devastating-trade-neurotoxins-sprayed-to-kill-harmful-mosquitoes-could-also-exterminate-beneficial-bees.htm
  • ‘Like It’s Been Nuked’: Millions of Bees Dead After South Carolina Sprays for Zika Mosquitoes,” The Washington Post 
    • September 1, 2016
    • Summary: Recently, South Carolina honey bees began to die in massive numbers. Death came suddenly to Dorchester County, S.C. Stressed insects tried to flee their nests, only to surrender in little clumps at hive entrances. The dead worker bees littering the farms suggested that colony collapse disorder was not the culprit—in that odd phenomenon, workers vanish as though raptured, leaving a living queen and young bees behind. Instead, the dead heaps signaled the killer was less mysterious, but no less devastating. The pattern matched acute pesticide poisoning. By one estimate, at a single apiary—Flowertown Bee Farm and Supply, in Summerville—46 hives died on the spot, totaling about 2.5 million bees.
    • https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/09/01/like-its-been-nuked-millions-of-bees-dead-after-south-carolina-sprays-for-zika-mosquitoes/?wpisrc=nl_most-draw7&wpmm=1
  • Dayton Issues ‘Bee Friendly’ Rules on Insecticide Use,” Star Tribune
    • August 26, 2016
    • Summary: Gov. Mark Dayton issued broad new guidelines Friday designed to restrict the use of a controversial pesticide that has been implicated in the decline of honeybees and other pollinators. Standing in the Agriculture-Horticulture building at the State Fair, next door to an exhibit hall filled with live bees and honey jars, the governor said his executive order would make Minnesota a leader in protecting pollinators.
    • http://www.startribune.com/dayton-issues-bee-friendly-rules-on-insecticide-use/391406601/
  • “The World Got Together to Try to Save the Monarch Butterfly, and Then Climate Change Ruined the Plan,” Quartz
    • August 25, 2016
    • Summary: In the winter months of 2015-2016, monarch butterflies had their best migration in years, arriving in record numbers to the Central Mexico forests where they hibernate. Unfortunately, those forests had a really bad year. Severe storms toppled many of the oyamel fir trees where millions of the iconic orange-winged insects rest after their long trip from Canada. More than 70 hectares of forest were damaged, the biggest loss since the 2009-2010 winter, according to data  released recently by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). In more bad news, experts expect the butterflies’ overwintering grounds to get hit by this sort of extreme weather more frequently in the future due to climate change.
    • http://qz.com/765418/climate-change-monarch-butterfly/
  • “Evidence Piles Up For Popular Pesticides’ Link to Pollinator Problems,” Science News
    • August 17, 2016
    • Summary: The link between pollinator problems and neonicotinoids, a group of agricultural pesticides commonly associated with declines in honeybees, continues to build with two new studies published this week. bee clip artButterflies of Northern California join the ranks of honeybees, bumblebees, moths and other organisms that may be feeling the effects of the infamous insecticides. Butterfly species in California’s Central Valley have dipped since the 1990s — around the same time that neonicotinoids were introduced. Matthew Forister of the University of Nevada and his colleagues report August 16 in Biology Lettersthat those two events may be linked.
    • https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker/evidence-piles-popular-pesticides-link-pollinator-problems?tgt=nr
  • “Bee Hives at Roosevelt University’s Schaumburg Campus to Enhance Prairie and Learning Opportunities,” eNews Park Forest (IL)
    •  July 29, 2016
    • Summary: Two hives containing more than 60,000 honey bees have found a home on the north side of Roosevelt University’s Schaumburg Campus where they are expected to contribute to healthy growth and sustainability of the campus’s prairie and community garden. Installed on July 15, the new bee apiary is being tended by a beekeeper from a social enterprise Chicago company called Sweet Beginnings, LLC, which has been providing ex-offenders with job opportunities in raising bees and collecting and selling honey since 2005.
    • https://enewspf.com/2016/07/29/bee-hives-roosevelt-universitys-schaumburg-campus-enhance-prairie-learning-opportunities/
  • “August Crossroads”
    • July 25, 2016
    • Summary: An important time of colony management that many new beekeepers overlook.
    • http://www.beeculture.com/august-crossroads/
  • “Bees swarm bike in Loop, drawing curious onlookers,” Chicago Tribune
    • June 6, 2016
    • Summary:
    • http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-loop-bee-swarm-captured-20160606-story.html
  • “28 percent of US bees wiped out this winter – suggesting bigger environmental issues”
    • May 11, 2016
    • http://www.rawstory.com/2016/05/28-percent-of-us-bees-wiped-out-this-winter-suggesting-bigger-environmental-issues/
    • http://www.democraticunderground.com/10141446550
  • “The Newest Strategy for Saving Bees is Really, Really Old,” Ensia
    • February 15, 2016
    • Summary: For centuries beehives have been part of the architecture of mountain homes in northwestern India, built into the thick outside walls. Traditionally wild colonies of bees found the hive themselves, or farmers brought a log with a hive in it from the surrounding forest so the inhabitants could set up shop in the village and produce honey for their human caretakers. But in recent years those wild colonies have become increasingly rare in this valley, where 90 percent of farmers are small landholders. Modern agriculture has replaced natural forests and the diverse crops of subsistence farms almost exclusively with a single apple variety: royal delicious, favored at the market. Producing this high-demand fruit has improved economic conditions for farmers in the Kullu Valley. But it also has contributed to an untenable environment for pollinators. Now, however, scientists are enlisting nature to turn that around. The Himalayan Ecosystems Research Project—a collaboration among scientists, Nashala villagers and international volunteers—is studying pollination in this area and applying what’s learned at the farm level to boost native Asian honeybees’ ability to thrive under their modern circumstances.
    • http://ensia.com/features/the-newest-strategy-for-saving-bees-is-really-really-old/
  • “EPA Finds Pesticide Hurts Honeybees on Some, but not all, Crops,” Seattle Times (WA)
    • January 6, 2016
    • Summary: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) found a class of pesticides widely used in agriculture and home gardens throughout Washington State and elsewhere caused significant risk to honeybees when applied to some crops, but had little effect when used on others. It’s the agency’s first scientific risk assessment of the much-debated class of pesticides called neonicotinoids and how they affect bees on a chronic long-term basis. The assessment neither clears the way for an outright ban nor is a blanket go-ahead for continued use of the pesticide. Both the pesticide maker and anti-pesticide advocates were unhappy with the agency’s report. Honeybees are crucial to our food supply and have been declining in population.
    • http://www.seattletimes.com/business/agriculture/epa-finds-pesticide-hurts-bees-on-some-but-not-all-crops/
  • California: Protections Imposed for Endangered Frogs, Toads,” The Washington Post