Beekeeping Terms

Beekeeping Terms (still under construction)

  • beeswax – secreted by four pairs of glands on underside of a worker honeybees abdomen, derived from flower nectar
  • cleansing flight – usually after winter when the weather permits bees leave the hive to defecate and leave yellow dots in the snow and sometimes even on laundry (so it is good to warn your neighbors)
  • Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) –
  • drones – male bees
  • guard bees –
  • honey – derived from flower nectar, the only food people eat that comes from insects, bees carry nectar in their “honey stomachs” that break down the sugars, in the hive they regurgitate the “nectar” and fan with their wings to evaporate the water and the result is honey, basically regurgitated and evaporated nectar
  • honey house – Place to store and harvest honey. Room should be warm and bee tight and have hot water available and able to clean the floors with water.
  • propolis – plant sap and resins combined with beeswax, helps keep hive clean and closed up
  • queen bee – largest bee in size and the only bee that lays the eggs, worker bees do not lay eggs
  • queen cap – on bottom frame, swarm cell, means getting ready to swarm
  • scout bees – collect pollen
  • supercedure – cells come up and look mummified, contain larvae to usually replace an old and or weak queen
  • surplus honey – the extra honey the hive does not need and is usually harvested
  • swarming – when bees leave the hive due to overcrowding
  • wildflower honey – nectar is collected from a variety of flowers
  • worker honeybees – female bees, complete most of chores inside the hive such as rearing brood and cleaning, only the queen lays eggs thoughmovable frame hive and uniform

Beekeeping Equipment

  • bee brush
  • bucket strainer
  • entrance reducer
  • extractor
  • feeder
  • frames
  • hive
  • hive tool
  • sugar syrup
  • sugar water
  • supers

Notable and or Famous Beekeepers

  • Karl Von Frisch (1886-1982) – Nobel Peace Prize, insects can communicate to one another, watching bees on comb
  • Martin Lindauer (1918-2008) – one of Karl Von Frisch’s students, German, swarming
  • Gene Killion (1924-2013) – apiary inspector from Illinois
  • Kirk Webster – beekeeper from Vermont
  • Marla Spivak – University of Minnesota, hygienic bees get rid of mites on their own, practice hygienic behaviors
  • Tammy Horn – Eastern Kentucky has book confronts coal companies Applacian mountains, make sustainable for beekeeping, planting trees
  • Mary Berenbaum – Univeristy of Illinois Champaign, science of colony collapse The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
  • Thomas D. Seeley – Honeybee democracy
  • Lorenzo Langstroth (1810-1895) – 1850s Pennsylvania, American pastor, movable frame hive
  • Francois Huber (1750-1831) – blind beekeeper, past needed hive close to where you live
  • Eva Crane (1912-2007) – wrote several beekeeping books, explains how beekeeping is actually very old (4000 years old) and shows pictures on cave walls beekeeping Asia, Europe, Egypt includes a pictures such as an old Mediterranean stone wall with hives in it