Star of David Bead Embroidery

star of David bead embroideryTo the right are pictures of a Star of David bead embroidery craft project I finished. As far as I currently know, a lot of bead embroidery is done by hand and I wanted a craft project a machine could not easily copy. The star is currently hanging on my living room wall in an 8″ inch (20. 32 cm) embroidery hoop. I ended up using a clear damage-free hanging utensil hook that holds .5 lb. I used three different colors of seed beads: crystal, glass transparent, and gold. Also, used six small silver heart shaped beads purchased on eBay. I used Microsoft paint and drew one triangle and copied it and rotated it to make the star. An internet search would have brought up a plethora of stars to use, if desired. Nevertheless, here is the Microsoft paint document of the star, star of David embroidery 7 or 8 inch hoop.

The picture to the right with the gold seed bead border and no water soluble stabilizer shows how I ended up having to put gold seed beads over other gold seed beads where the lines met and to avoid that I would complete it one triangle at a time. The next time I make this project I would outline one triangle first with the two or three rows of gold seed beads despite the minor nuisance of the water soluble stabilizer. The picture shows no water soluble stabilizer as it disappeared rather fast when water was run over it. A water erasable white ink fabric marker was used to draw straight lines in the star to help keep me on track in the direction I was hand sewing them. The organza fabric made it difficult to use the marker. In the future it may be better to use the marker on the kona cotton and then place the organza over the cotton fabric. I just used a standard small eye hand sewing needle and aimed to put five beads on it at a time and the sewed back maybe two or three beads and then added about five more beads. There was an issue with some seed beads not fitting through the needle and those beads were placed in a small separate container. star of David bead embroidery

The center beads are Beadaholique brand and were already pre-strung on a piece of thread. It seemed like it would be faster to just attempt to fasten down the pre-strung strands as opposed to the five bead method mentioned in the paragraph above. However, this lead to the beads being less secure, less straight, and overlap (having to place beads on top of each other, like with the gold seed beads). The beads in the center use the pre-stranded method and the hand sewing five beads at a time method. There was an issue with the Beadaholique beads not fitting past the needle eye and I would say it was worse than the Darice brand seed beads. This makes me wonder if using a beading needle would be better. Supposedly, because they are longer than most needles they are cumbersome and are for weaving and knitting fabric more than hand sewing beads. The six small triangles use the Darice glass transparent beads using the hand sewing method with about five beads at a time.

For the thread, I originally started using a metallic silver thread with beeswax for a thread conditioner. Still, I ran into issues with the metallic thread. The silver metallic part of the
thread sometimes separated from the inner white part from going in and out of the fabric. I ended up using a hand sewing thread. Although it was not silver in color it was much easierstar of David bead embroidery to work with and did not need the conditioner. I added a black organza fabric on top of the black kona fabric (which was on fusible fabric for stability) to add a more finished and delicate and decorative look. The fabric was washed and ironed. I tried using a tambour hook with the three layers of fabric and it did not work out well. Possibly, tambour hook embroidery needles work best with one layer of fabric. Also used a no slip Morgan hoop. I have used just the wooden frame embroidery hoops in the past. The Morgan hoop is more deluxe. I did make a few mistakes such as a few beads on the back of the hoop. I glued the fabric around the hoop to the back also. Despite the mistakes it made something beautiful.

 

Products used:

  • Command Brand Damage-free hanging utensil hook, holds .5lb – command.com
  • Darice Craft Suppliers 8″ inch embroidery hoop
  • Beadaholique (TM) Czech Seed Beads 11/0 Cry BCS – 1010 ISBN 8 49087 01694 4
  • Darice Craft Designer (TM) Rocaille Beads S/L Gold – darice.com – 1017-22   ISBN 0 82676 66833 3     – 8387 201607 0101star of David bead embroidery
  • Darice Craft Designer (TM) Glass Transparent Rainbow Seed Beads 10/0 Clear AB – 1103-19 ISBN 0 82676 50263 7    – 8837 201605 0101
  • silver heart beads purchased on eBay – seller jennysun2013
  • standard regular sewing needle
  • needle threader (optional)
  • hand sewing thread and metallic sliver thread and beeswax for a thread conditioner
  • black kona cotton fabric
  • black organza fabric
  • fusible fabric star of David bead embroidery
  • water erasable white fabric marker purchased on eBay
  • Morgan embroidery hoop combo lap stand
    • nosliphoops.com
    • can use for punch needle, embroidering, red work, cross stitch, rug hooking, quilting
    • can place felt on bottom hoop to act as padding on legs
  • Paper Solvy (TM) water soluble stabilizer Sulky(R) create with confidence (TM), printed design on the paper using computer, sulky.com

 

Published by SewIsabel

Spare-time aspiring fiber artist, gardener, beekeeper and sew much more! Author of SewIsabel.com.

One thought on “Star of David Bead Embroidery

  1. I also am looking into a way to sign and date the back of the piece. I think Fons & Porter has a fabric that is easy to write on. Will update what I find for this. I am not sure I want to use those handmade small rectangles they sell.

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